What is history?

I read this recent article by Richard McFahn with interest as it touches on an issue I’ve been grappling with and trying to find a convincing answer to. What is history? What is our purpose when we teach history to our children at school? I have already attempted to discuss this in a previous post, […]

Should new teachers read lots of books and blogs?

I was pulled up short by this Tweet yesterday. Needless to say, I disagree with the sentiment. I can only go by my own experience here, but reading books and blogs have exposed me to so many ideas and made me think more deeply about what education, and particularly history teaching, should be about. If […]

The myth of didactic teaching

One of the delights of travelling is finding yourself unable to sleep in an unfamiliar bed. If you’re not careful your thoughts can start going into overdrive and sleep will elude you even further. I find myself in such a situation tonight.  Rather than fight the battle of the heavy duvet,  I’ve decided to address […]

Educational Jargon

Many, many years ago, no doubt inspired by having watched too many episodes of ‘Dynasty’, I aspired to be a big shot in business. I saw myself strutting into boardrooms and negotiating impressive deals (wearing the sharpest of business suits). With this in the back of my mind, I enrolled on an MBA course (a […]

Curriculum musings

In my last blog I talked about how the educational landscape has changed beyond recognition since my own days at school. Most subjects, except perhaps for art, maths and science, have very altered curricula and pedagogy. I think maths, because of its nature, is much harder to turn into a skills-based subject, and so it […]

Having to win the argument all over again

In a speech last June, the Chancellor of the Exchequer, Philip Hammond, talked about the importance of a market economy with strong growth and remarked “I thought that we had won that argument. But I learnt in the general election that we had not.” These words come to mind when I consider some of the […]

ResearchEd Rugby, my takeaways (part 3)

Session 3: Martin Robinson Next, I attended Martin Robinson’s talk which focused on “the conversational classroom”. I’m not finding it quite so easy to summarise this particular talk because there was a lot covered (cognitive overload) and no clear structure (could have done with some dual coding to help organise the information more). So here […]

ResearchEd Rugby, my takeaways (part 2)

Debate: “Education Matters” After session 1, it was time for a panel discussion rather than a debate, with Andrew Old, David Didau, Tom Sherrington and Karen Wespieser discussing Ofsted, MATs and the role of research in education. My main takeaways from the discussion were: Under the leadership of Amanda Spielman, Ofsted is moving away from […]