What does studying history teach us?

I read an interesting article by Mark Bailey in the Times today, kindly shared on this tweet. In it I learned that history has superseded PPE as the most commonly held degree among the nation’s MPs – 15% of all parliamentarians and 10% of the Cabinet are trained historians. Not only this but several high […]

My round up of the week

A week is a long time on edu-twitter. In between going out and about entertaining an 8-year old and assembling the flat pack from hell (@oldandrewuk has nothing on me when it comes to flat pack furniture), I’ve been dipping in and out of my Twitter feed, which, despite it being August, has been as […]

Old history essays

The Summer holiday has provided an opportunity for a major clear-out and re-organisation of all my accumulated possessions. In the process, I have re-discovered a box file full of my old essays from school and university which have miraculously survived all my mother’s many culls of my stuff. I think it was important for me […]

Change and continuity in history teaching

Since accepting a history teacher training place through Schools Direct, I have delved into the substance and theory of my new profession, reading teacher blogs, professional journals and books (both history and theory books) . I must confess to finding the history books fun and interesting to read, the theory ones rather less so. Burrowing […]

How do you change a school’s culture?

One of the lovely things about reading lots of teacher blogs is that it stimulates my mind and gets me thinking about particular issues or ideas. Often, having pondered these thoughts, I am minded to put them into writing here, on my own blog. And thus, I am able to join in that conversation of […]

What is history?

I read this recent article by Richard McFahn with interest as it touches on an issue I’ve been grappling with and trying to find a convincing answer to. What is history? What is our purpose when we teach history to our children at school? I have already attempted to discuss this in a previous post, […]

Should new teachers read lots of books and blogs?

I was pulled up short by this Tweet yesterday. Needless to say, I disagree with the sentiment. I can only go by my own experience here, but reading books and blogs have exposed me to so many ideas and made me think more deeply about what education, and particularly history teaching, should be about. If […]

The myth of didactic teaching

One of the delights of travelling is finding yourself unable to sleep in an unfamiliar bed. If you’re not careful your thoughts can start going into overdrive and sleep will elude you even further. I find myself in such a situation tonight.  Rather than fight the battle of the heavy duvet,  I’ve decided to address […]

Putting my oar into the knowledge versus skills debate

I wrote this a while ago, on a different blog. After re-reading it, I find I’m still in agreement with its sentiment. Nearly everything I read on my Twitter feed these days seems to be connected, in one way or another, to the knowledge versus skills debate that is currently raging in certain educational circles. […]